Tips on dealing with homesickness

homesickness

by Maddi

1. Get out of your room:

It’s so easy to spend hours watching netflix or reading in bed, eating the boxes of thin mints that the strategically-placed girl scout stands guilted you into buying and drinking your day’s worth of nutrients in Emergen-C’s.

It’s so tempting to change into pajamas after class at 2pm and procrastinate your schoolwork by hibernating until dinner. But this temptation, especially towards the beginning of the year, is one of the biggest catalysts of homesickness. Homesickness is normal and often prevalent no matter how far away from home you go. That being said, going out of state or across the country really limits the opportunity to go home, so it’s best to find methods to deal with feeling homesick.

I’ve found that one of the best ways to deal with homesickness is to occupy yourself with something outside of your room. Whether it’s going on a run, going to get ice cream, or finding a pretty view to draw a picture of, forcing yourself to leave your room helps you adapt and get used to your surroundings.

2. Join a sport team or club similar to what you did at home

Although I’ve met the majority of my friends through clubs or teams that are different from what I participated in in High school, I’ve found that playing soccer here has been a great way to still feel connected to home. Whether it’s an Intramural, club, or varsity sport, doesn’t really matter as long as it isn’t adding extra stress.

Playing a sport or joining a club similar to what you did before college is comforting yet allows you to individualize that experience even more for yourself – which i have found to be really rewarding.

3. Join a group that is outside of your comfort zone:

While joining a familiar activity can be comforting, becoming a part of a group outside of your comfort zone differentiates life at college from life at home – which really helps the adaptation process.

For me, my unfamiliar experience was joining the Cal quidditch team. While yes it is nerdy and weird, it is the activity that compiles many of my different interests into one and has thoroughly changed my experience here at Cal. Little did I know that quidditch is a highly physical and competitive sport that takes part in the United States Quidditch association and has the close team atmosphere that I had always loved about soccer. Combining this competitive team atmosphere and my love for Harry Potter, quidditch turned out to be the perfect place for me to meet the people who I had most in common with – now my best friends.

Staying ACTIVE!

active(2)

by Lulu

I’m pretty sure we’ve all heard about gaining the “Freshman 15”, so what can you do to prevent that from happening?

Well it’s definitely a lot easier said than done. As someone who participated in sports throughout high school, it was easy to stay active because practices were mandatory exercise in my schedule. If not for the obligatory conditioning and training, I’d consider myself quite unmotivated to get ready and go to the gym.

Like many college students, continuing and maintaining a healthy lifestyle in college is a priority for me. Because college is such a crazy, busy time for balancing numerous aspects of your life, that is just another reason to stay active: to relieve stress. Balancing a social life and academic course load can be really challenging, so you may ask yourself ‘how can I find time to stay active during college?’

There are several ways to integrate exercise into other parts of your life to make new friends and have fun while being healthy! Depending on the college you attend, the options may vary due to the resources and facilities available at your school, but a workout option for anyone is to go running or biking on a trail around campus.

I personally love going on a run on the East River Parkway down by the Mississippi River or by the Stone Arch Bridge. On warmer days, I like to bike to the Walker Art Center for a longer workout. Sometimes running alone can be dreadful, so to make working out a social activity and something to look forward to, I figured out weekly running sessions with friends .

For those students whose college is located in an area that is affected by the arctic tundra of winter, like the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, running year-round may not be an option. But chances are the college has invested in an indoor recreational facility or gym for student-use!

The words “I’m going to the gym” may prompt a negative connotation in your mind, but working out is a must to stay active and has many benefits. There are stationary machines like cycling or elliptical machines that hold books, so it’s possible to combine studying and working out to make it a win-win situation. By carving out time to workout in my weekly schedule, it becomes easier to be motivated to go to the gym and makes me less stressed about other time commitments. Another positive aspect of making exercise routine, is that it relieves stress and may become an outlet or distraction from other stressors.

Another great option for those interested in a competitive workout atmosphere is intramural or club sports. At the U, there are the official Division I sports teams with the highest level of competition, club sports for competitive athletes still interested in a structured schedule with serious coaching, and then there are intramurals which are similar to competing in sports at the Park & Rec level.

I’m a part of the University Running Club and we have weekly practice with coaches and compete against other Division II and III schools in the National Intramural Running Club Association on the weekends. On the other hand, intramurals are extremely fun and there are varying levels of competitiveness as well. I’m on the coed flag football team and we have very minimal time commitments throughout the week. We have tons of fun but still enjoy the thrill of winning on game days!

There are numerous ways to be as competitive or active as you wish in college. For individuals who really enjoyed being part of a team in high school or even for those with minimal experience, I encourage you to take a chance and try out for a club or intramural team sport. It may be frightening and scary at first, but others have gone through the process before and it is definitely worth it. Your future teammates and friends will love you as an additional benefit.

I can guarantee you won’t regret it!

 

January Q: What do you think are the biggest misconceptions about college for high school students?

myth

This year we’ve launched a monthly question feature, where our bloggers respond to questions from current high school students. Our January question is: What do you think are the biggest misconceptions about college for high school students?

Maddi (Cal-Berkeley): The biggest misconception is that everyone drinks or parties and that a social stigma exists surrounding those who don’t go crazy; the party scene can be a lot more controlled and is definitely a choice.

Julie (U of MN – TC):  College will be easy. (It isn’t impossble! But it’s also hard work!)

Ariana (UMN Duluth):  That everyone likes to party and you have to drink otherwise it’s not a fun time. But now I think it’s the kind of people who you spend your time with… Get to know people that can have a good time all the time, without drinking.

Ellie (McGill):   That making friends will be difficult like it might have been in high school. Being in college gives so many opportunities to meet people, your friends will find you. Trust me.

Home for the Holidays

home

By Guanani

Coming home for winter break after being away for college can be unexpectedly disorienting.

This was especially the case for me, having chosen a school more than a thousand miles away from Minneapolis in Portland, Oregon. Even though I’m close to and on good terms with my family, suddenly being surrounded by them after months of figuring out how to live on my own was more of a challenge than I expected. I immediately missed the personal freedoms college offers; being able to go anywhere without having to tell anyone, the privacy of making my own decisions, and the spontaneous socializing opportunities I had gotten used to at Reed.

After the ridiculously busy last few weeks of the semester, I was looking forward to spending time with my family and having nothing to do for several days. But once I had finally turned in my last final exam, packed up my warm clothes and gotten off the plane into the chilly Minneapolis air, I mostly felt lost and confused.

I have two homes now: the familiar Minneapolis I grew up in and Portland, whose streets are full of memories and new friends and freedom to explore all kinds of new challenges. After weeks of going full throttle, always having some kind of assignment to work on or outing to participate in, being home almost felt stifling.

With free time to spare, I suddenly didn’t know what to do with myself.

Eventually the feeling subsided. I found projects to work on, spent the holidays with family and friends from high school, and came to feel much better about being home. But I know that initial shock of returning will only get stronger the more time I spend away. My new life at college that I worried so much about the summer after high school has become my normal life, and I can’t help but be a little sad that I don’t feel as at home here in Minneapolis as I used to.

Curious, I asked my friends who go to different colleges how they felt about coming home. Everyone had their version of similar feelings, which boiled down to wanting to stay connected to their childhood home and family but also not wanting to spend too much time there. My parents also noticed that I was talking much more about Portland this year, and that I seemed bored at home. My dad said he understood, but was clearly sad. “I’m not as important in your life anymore,” he lamented. “But make sure to keep visiting. We miss you over here.”

After some reflection, I’ve decided I probably won’t stay home during all of winter break next year. But I would at least like to visit for the holidays, when everyone else comes together. Even though I feel increasingly separate from them, there are still many unique things I love about my family and Minneapolis.

I know it’s important to spend time here, at least for short visits, and stay connected.

November Q: What do you miss most about being a High School student?

HS

This year we’ve launched a monthly question feature, where our bloggers respond to questions from current high school students. Our November question is: What do you miss most about being a High School student?

Julie (U of MN – TC): Being surrounded by a close group of friends.

Lydia (MCAD): The ability to miss a class if you are ill and being able to make it up the next day. There is a zero absence policy at MCAD.

Ariana (UMN Duluth): I miss not having to do so much work. And being debt free!

Alia (MCTC): What I miss most from high school is having a school locker. There are lockers at my college, but not everyone gets one and they are super small. I miss having a locker to put my stuff in.

Maddi (Cal-Berkeley): The free time to do leisure activities; painting, working out, reading for pleasure etc.

Lucillia (St. Thomas): The thing I miss most about being a high school student is the amount of responsibility. Now that I am in college as an adult, I have many more responsibilities and sometimes it is too much.

Being an Athlete in College

hamline

by Sam

Joining the Hamline Swim and Dive team has definitely been the best decision I could of possibly made, besides attending Hamline of course!

Coach Hawke and Coach Mike have created the most challenging, yet fun and loving environment for each athlete on the team. They challenge us not only in the water, but also in our academics. Having coaches who want you to succeed in all your goals, and are able to give you the resources to do so has been extremely helpful.

In the past, my experiences have always been with swimming being my main priority, so this change is very welcomed! Coach Hawke started coaching the Hamline Swim and Dive team starting in 2013, and has greatly improved everything about the program. He expects only the best, and pushes every swimmer to be and do their best. He wants results and he gets them.

Originally I wasn’t planning on swimming in college, I had lost my love for the sport, but Hawke reminded me why I started swimming 11 years ago, and I can’t wait to see where the rest of this season, and the next three, take me.

If you are interested in playing a sport in college, I definitely recommend getting in touch with a coach as early as the beginning of your junior year!

Talk to them about their expectations for you as an athlete, their coaching styles, their standings in their conference, and how you would improve as an athlete under their direction. I met Coach Hawke by chance at a Piper Preview (Hamline Fall visit day/tour.) I wasn’t expecting anything, I just took a chance and look at where I am today! Swimming for my dream team!

He was straight forward with his expectations for me as an athlete and a student, and discussed with me why I was an important asset for his team. He eventually introduced me to the team over an MEA overnight, and I have never looked back.

Division III (D3) athletics was a great option for me personally, because it had more of an emphasis on putting your education first compared to a lot of the D1 and D2 colleges I had toured earlier. Coach Hawke has an amazing passion for the sport, and I can’t wait to see what he helps me achieve.

So in closing, do your research while touring colleges! And if you are interested in playing a sport contact coaches NOW!!

They love it when you contact them, and want to know about their programs! I have never once regretted joining this amazing team, although getting up for morning practices may suck in the moment, I know every hour I spend in the pool I will be more prepared to kick butt in the 100 fly at MIAC in February!

Also for any of you swimmers looking to swim in college, definitely contact coach Hawke! We are always looking for new talent and would love for you to join our Piper family!

October Q: What is your favorite non-class activity/event/club so far in your college career and what did you like so much about it?

clubss

This year we’ve launched a monthly question feature, where our bloggers respond to questions from current high school students. Our October question is: What is your favorite non-class activity/event/club so far in your college career and what did you like so much about it?

Julie (U of MN – TC): The Hmong Minnesota Student Association Club because I will be an actor in one of their biggest events this year, Heritage Day! I can’t wait to act!

Maddi (Cal-Berkeley): I joined the Berkeley quidditch team the second week of school and it was the best decision I’ve made so far. It’s so fun not only because it incorporates Harry Potter and it is an actual workout, but the team atmosphere and the players are the type of people I get along best with

Ellie (McGill): I’m on the Varsity Track and Field team here at McGill so that’s definitely my favorite! I have made some great friends who love to run as much as I do, and I’ve becomes a much better competitor as well. Another big plus is that it keeps me in shape.

Alia (MCTC): I’m a co-leader of the writing club at my school and we have had awesome turn outs and really interesting people come to our meetings. We have students write from a prompt we provide and then they share their writing with the group. I enjoy being a co-leader because I get to decide stuff and make colorful crazy posters. We’re having a halloween party soon, the school gives us money to do this kind of stuff and it’s going to be so awesome.

Lucillia (St. Thomas): My favorite non-class activity so far would have to be Art club. Before I came to college, I was never really interested in art, but after going to a couple of meetings with my friend, I really began to really enjoy it! Though I am terrible at painting, I look forward to going each week!

Natalie (Concordia): I founded a Feminism Club on campus and it has been such a wonderful experience.  It has been so inspiring to hear messages from people who don’t know much about feminism thanking us for creating a safe space to learn about equality.

Midwest to West Coast

UC-Berkeley

by Maddi

Flying from Minneapolis to San Francisco International Airport, the first sign I saw when I stepped off the plane had directions to a yoga room. Needless to say, I had arrived in California! Too many suitcases and boxes in hand, my mom and I made our way through three-hour traffic over to the East Bay and our hotel right near my new school, the University of California at Berkeley.

yoga room

Move-in day was relatively smooth. My mom seemed to die a little inside each time she saw the size of my room, but I got the bottom bunk, which had been my main focus. To all future college dorm residents: the bottom bunk is essential to your overall happiness, so sacrifice other battles to win this one.

Along with the great bed situation, my randomly selected roommates turned out to be awesome. Picking random is a risk, but it also allows for the chance for you to meet people you might not normally reach out to, which is something that I definitely recommend.

So far, during the one month that I have lived here, Berkeley and life in California have lived up to almost every positive stereotype and expectation that I’d had coming from Minnesota.

It wasn’t just California’s weather that drew me here, but the stereotype that the people are generally open minded and progressive. The atmosphere of the student body and the type of people living in Berkeley were really important to me, and I think that these are factors that can greatly affect your adaptation to college, especially if you’re going far from home. I was able to bond with my floor-mates and most people I met quickly due to our similar values and mindsets. My Spanish class bonded right away through our discussions on Donald Trump and immigration, for example.

Another enticing feature of Berkeley for me was the stereotype that students were not only socially aware and passionate about creating change, but that they were less mainstream and a little weirder than most student bodies. This is something that I found to be true as soon as I moved in, and is one of my favorite parts of being here.

Anything and everything goes here – whether that concerns clothing or recreational activity or whatever else. I joined the Berkeley Quidditch team and am currently enrolled in a Harry Potter class called “UC Hogwarts.” These were two of the best decisions I have ever made. The unique personality of the student body largely corresponds to the cultural diversity of the campus, and this is another factor that I have found to be really important.

Over half of my floor is international and thus racially and culturally diverse. In the one month I’ve lived here I have already learned more about east Asian and Indian culture than in my whole life up until now!

school board

Just as Berkeley exceeded my social expectations, the rigor of the academics was by no means exaggerated!

I walked into my first day of chemistry class with 400 very intelligent students to find a rotating blackboard filled with foreign concepts entitled, “A review of the fundamentals.” That being said, don’t be discouraged from applying or attending a prestigious school. I soon realized that most people were in the same boat as I was and I’ve developed good study habits that benefit my schedule.

I look forward to providing more Berkeley updates throughout the coming year!

The Transfer Student Transition

transfer-header

by Cara

Sometimes, I feel like I’m a freshman again.

I pronounce the names of campus buildings wrong. I panic when random people ask me for directions to the library. I almost walked into the wrong classroom during the second week of class.

Last month, I started my sophomore year of college and my first semester at the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities.

As you may remember, I attended the University of St. Thomas during my freshman year and decided to transfer because it wasn’t the right fit for me. I hoped to have more academic and social opportunities at the U of M, and so far I am pleased with my experience!

I didn’t have transfer orientation until the end of June. Compared to my freshman year orientation, this year’s orientation was shorter and more focused on class selection. I researched and printed out two schedule options before my orientation, so when I finally met with my academic advisor it was easy to explain what classes I wanted to take.

Since I’m done with the majority the U of M’s general education requirements, every class I’m taking this semester was selected because I wanted to take it. I’m taking the first journalism course required for admission to the major, two political science courses, microeconomics, and a 1-credit, online public health course.

I was able to set up my schedule so that I’m done with class everyday by the early afternoon, and I don’t have any classes on Fridays! Back when I was researching colleges, I always checked if the school offered the majors I was interested in, but I didn’t look in depth at their class offerings.

If you are a student looking at colleges, think about more than just your major!

Does the school offer alternative class arrangements such as online classes or classes held only once a week? I love being able to take two of my classes online. It allows me to work at my own pace and re-watch the course lectures, if I don’t understand the content the first time. Are all students required to take the same general education courses such as Biology 101, or do you get to choose which science course you take? I enjoy having many course options to fulfill the U of M’s requirements.

Freshmen at the U of M have a whole week of activities to welcome them to campus, but transfer students have a smaller offering of events. I went to a few of the events such as one at the student union where there were different free foods to eat and activities to do on each floor.

The main way I’ve made new friends is by meeting friends of my friends! I attended business camp at the U of M’s Carlson School of Management the summer before my senior year of high school, so I already knew students on campus. Since they have already been at the U of M for year, they are able to show me around campus and tell me about the different student groups. I love to go to events held by the many cultural student clubs on campus. We learn something new about another culture and get free food! My favorite event I’ve attend so far is Wam-O-Ram! It was held in the U of M’s Weisman Art Museum. There were free screen printed t-shirts, free pizza, a mini concert, and of course viewing of the numerous art pieces.

As a transfer student it can take a little extra work to make new friends and get involved on campus, but I am pleased with my decision to transfer. I can’t wait to see what other experiences I’ll have during my first semester at the U of M, and I am excited to share them with all of you!

Hello Freshman Year!

freshman year

by Sam

Saying hello to freshman year was cool, until I had to say hello to the 5am morning swim practices that came with it.

The past three weeks have been action packed, and quite stressful. From learning how to balance academics and swimming, to making new friends! I’ve never considered myself shy, but orientation left me culture shocked and at a loss for words.

Hamline University is a diverse, open-minded, progressive campus. I’ve found a home, and a calling to grow.

During my first week at Hamline I was a part of a Multicultural Mosaic program, an honors program that focuses around educating people about cultural diversity and sexual orientation, as well as creating a safe community for others to speak about their struggles as a person of color or being a part of the LGBTQ community. Being a part of the Multicultural Mosaic program gave me a deep insight into the struggles of my peers and gave me an environment to develop personally!

I definitely recommend looking into the pre-orientation programs offered at the schools you’re applying for; each school offers a variety of programs for a variety of interests. Being a part of the pre-orientation program here at Hamline has given me the resources to navigate campus and make friends from all over the world.

Although I am still in shock over being a college freshman, I am excited for what this year brings, and can’t wait to share my adventures with you!

Transition Summer

tips-to-having-happy-summer

by Guanani

Senior year is just about over.

Hopefully most things are in order; you know where you’ll be going, you’ve wrapped up your last semester, and you’ve figured out how you want to celebrate graduation. Only three months stretch ahead before the bold frontier of the future…

Wait, only three months?!

The realization that I would be moving more than 500 miles away and leaving everything I knew behind in mere months was a delayed-reaction shock for me. In a haze of pre-nostalgia and panic, I made several drafts of packing lists, checked the Reed website every day to make sure I didn’t miss any important information, and wrote up a summer bucket list of things I wanted to do before leaving.

These preparations helped me get ready for the move to college, but I felt sad and woefully unprepared emotionally for most of the summer. I was excited to live somewhere outside of Minnesota and begin a new chapter in my life, but leaving my family and friends behind was heavy in my heart even when I was doing fun things with them.

If I could talk to myself from last summer, I would tell her:

  1. Calm down
  2. You aren’t leaving forever, these people will still be part of your life when you come back
  3. You won’t have time to read all those fun books in your suitcase 😦

That being said, I do recommend taking steps to make sure you don’t miss any important announcements from the college you’ll be attending, especially with all the forms and paperwork they will need for housing, registration, orientation events and health insurance. The bucket list was also a lot of fun to complete, though I really didn’t need to be so heavy-handed about it being the last time I’d get to do fun things at home. Figuring out what you need to pack well ahead of time makes the already difficult last week before moving less stressful, and the fewer things you bring with, the better.

I had a lot of fun during my transition summer: I hung out with friends, swam in the Chain of Lakes, read good books for fun, and finally got my drivers’ license.

However, the persistent worrying about everything being “the last” was unpleasant and unnecessary, and made the last two weeks especially difficult. Everything was ready except for me: my flight to Portland was booked, my boxes were packed, and most of the items on my bucket list had been checked off. The last days before leaving were filled with fretful goodbyes: everyone wanted another hug, another picnic or sleepover before I had to leave.

Everything felt irreversibly final, like walking toward a cliff. Looking back it seems overdramatic, now that I’ve built a home away from home and found friends in college. But it was very real at the time.

The summer after senior year is an odd one. Even if the transition feels awkward, or like it’s going by too fast, or you can’t wait to just get out of the house, it should also be enjoyable. Spend lots of time with your loved ones and read for fun while you can.

You’ve come a long way, and it’s time to relax and prepare for wherever you’re going.

BestPrep Essay Competition (Grades 9 – 11)

best prep

by Minneapolis Alumni Connection (MAC)

Calling all Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior writers!

We wanted to bring up a tremendous opportunity to develop and hone your writing skills and win some great prizes in the process with the BestPrep essay competition. Prizes include great Apple products, such as a MacBook Air and iPads; a Kindle Fire; and Target gift cards.

The topic for this year’s competition is “The Value of Education.” This topic is inspired by an extremely talented, influential woman from Benin, Angelique Kidjo. Ms. Kidjo wrote the powerful book, “Spirit Rising: My Life, My Music” – for more info on this book Click Here. The top 20 student winners will be invited to the Educational Forum featuring Ms. Kidjo in fall of 2015.

The due date for the 600-750 word essay is April 8, 2015. Students will be writing in response to the following prompt:

Education in the United States is often times taken for granted. What is the value of education locally, and around the world? Why should we care about the education of a student in Benin, Africa (Angélique’s home country), and why should Angélique Kidjo care about the education of a student in Minnesota? What challenges do you face in your own educational and career journey, and how do you plan to overcome these challenges?

For more information, or if you have questions, please contact Megan Gustafson at mgustafson@bestprep.org or 763-233-6322.

Good luck!

Down to the Minute

A Beginner’s Guide to Time Management

clock

by Natalie

College, not unlike all other stages of life, requires amazing skills of patience, scheduling, finagling, and, most importantly, time management.  In my first semester at Concordia I was taking 18 academic credits and working 5 hours a week for a small stipend as an intern in the theatre department, as well as balancing a full-fledged romantic relationship and a role in the musical, Les Miserables.

This semester, however, is a little different.  First, I stopped working in the theatre department because it didn’t pay enough and it wasn’t a good fit for me as far as scheduling hours went.  Second, I’m only taking 15 credits this semester, as I started taking an elective class about lighting design that proved to be too much to chew.  Third, I picked up a job working at Target.  I work 10-20 hours a week, folding clothes and working the cash registers.  And, on top of all of that, this semester, a friend of mine was hospitalized and I spent a good chunk of time being there for her.

I like to think of everything in my life as a class with a credit number.

  • My boyfriend, Nick, is a 4-credit course.
  • My role in Les Mis was two 4-credit courses; it took up about as much time as 2 full academic classes and I put in extra work on show weekends.
  • My job in the theatre department was a 1-credit course.
  • My job at Target is a 4-credit course.
  • My friend in the hospital was a 2-credit course.
  • My Netflix habit is definitely a 2-credit course at least.
  • My social life at large is probably about a 2-credit course as well (if we don’t include Nick and my friend in the hospital).

Assuming I did my math correctly (which is not a safe assumption), I came out with 35 credits last semester and 29 this semester.  So why did last semester seem so much easier than this semester has been so far?

Well folks, it comes down to how well I’ve been managing my time.  Last semester, I kept myself to a strict schedule that documented what I had planned 24/7.  I would wake up, go to breakfast, go to class, do chores, go to my next 2 classes, do homework, go to choir, get dinner, watch an episode of whatever series I was working on in Netflix, go to rehearsal, do homework, hang out with Nick, go to bed.  Lather, rinse, repeat.

This semester I haven’t handled my time in the conservative fashion I did last semester.  I have been waking up, going to class, getting lunch with friends, dilly dallying all the way to my next two classes, going to choir, getting dinner, going to work, coming home and going to bed.  On the days that I don’t have classes (Tuesday and Thursday this semester), instead of getting up and taking care of business, I sleep in really late, waste a whole bunch of time on Buzzfeed, eventually do some homework, eat dinner, go to work, hang out with Nick, hang out with other friends, stay up really late doing the homework I’ve been putting off, and then, finally, getting to bed.

The moral of this story, dear readers, is to take care of your time in college.  Ration it, split it up, portion it, and schedule it.  Make it work for you, not against you.  Working out a routine might seem mundane and boring but it is so beneficial when you set aside an hour and a half here, 45 minutes there to get your homework done.

College isn’t just going to class, and working a job so you can pay your tuition.  College isn’t just parties and friends and good times.  College is hard.  It’s hard work, it’s a lot of work and it takes a lot of time.  Time management is the best way to handle the barrage of knowledge and experience you’ll get hit with in college.

You might seem a little crazy at first when you have your day planned down to the minute but you’ll feel less stressed, more motivated, and you’ll learn how to be accountable to yourself and to others.  Time is money and we’ll all need to pay off our student loans someday.